Nurses are on the Coronavirus Frontline but They’re Being Left out of the Response

Nurses and other clinicians have been the face of the pandemic. They represent one of the most accommodating sectors of the workforce, rising to treat critically ill patients, as well as the collateral damage from fragile healthcare systems, and disordered government responses. Labeling them “heroes” doesn’t protect them physically or mentally, and experts warn that a mental health crisis among healthcare workers could emerge in the virus’s wake.

More than 600 nurses all over the world have died from COVID-19 and it is not a surprise: they are the largest group of healthcare workers worldwide, dedicating to prevent the spread of the virus, and they are also engaged in caring for those who are suffering. But although they are on the frontline of this crisis, nurses are too often being left out of responses to the pandemic.

 

A study of almost 100,000 health workers in the UK and US found that people working on the frontline of the pandemic were three times more likely to test positive for COVID-19 than the general public. Workers who reported a lack of adequate PPE in their healthcare institutions were at greater risk still.

And as nurses battle the coronavirus pandemic on the front line, 2020 is the year of the World Health Organization’s Year of the Nurse and Midwife, a date that would theoretically raise the profile and perceptions of nurses globally. Given the opportunity, nurses could be of great assistance, given all their knowledge and experiences, to help guide coronavirus policy in several ways:

 

  • By being a witness to the health impacts of COVID-19 in their local communities and staff, recording and researching inequity of access to services.
  • Nurses can advise on how to provide prevention and treatment resources to those most at risk.
  • Nurses can set a positive example in terms of equality of opportunity, fair working conditions, protection from infection and pay. This could start with ensuring equal provision of PPE for all staff.

 

Nurses are currently at the forefront of an important social cause, actively trying to reduce the existing health inequalities which are being made worse by COVID-19, while still taking care of all patients no matter their condition, and doing so without the proper personal protective equipment.

We are Working Hard to Create a Safe Environment for Everyone

At We Shield we are currently sourcing and distributing the highest-quality PPE throughout the U.S. at a competitive price and time, we import our safety supplies via private cargo planes multiple times a week and have the experience, certifications, and connections to expedite the process and make it as affordable as possible to support the immediate safety goals of our clients.